The Hoarders of Babylon part 2

Standard

So are you with me so far class? In prehistoric times it was share and share alike. Then with the rise of settled agricultural societies came notions of private property and keep your hands off my stack, jack. And according to the authors of “ SEX AT DAWN, the Prehistoric Origins of Modern Sexuality,”  the sharing extended to sex as well. “ A great deal of research from Primatology, Anthropology, Anatomy, and Psychology points to the same fundamental conclusions:

Human beings and our hominid ancestors have spent almost all of the past few million years or so in small, initimate bands in which most adults had several sexual relationships at any given time. This approach to sexuality probably persisted until the rise of agriculture and private property no more than 10,000 years ago. When people began living in settled agricultural communities, social reality shifted deeply and irrevocably.

Suddenly it became crucially important to know where your field ended and your neighbor’s began. Thus patriarchal notions of private property began. They go on to quote the 10th Commandment: “ Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor’s house, thou shalt not covet thy neighbor’s wife, nor his manservant, nor his maidservant, nor his ox, nor his ass ( ! ) nor anything that is thy neighbor’s… “ These things were considered  a man’s possessions ( got that ladies? ). And when you got stuff you have to protect it. With the increase of population and the rise of city states, the male warrior became the dominant mode. So there it is in a nutshell and that’s where we are today.

So I ask you this, to quote a fun little ditty by the Florida band, RUDY :

“ What are you going to do with all the love that you’re hiding in your underpants? “

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s